An Abundance of Writing Quotes

Writing quotes are rich with advice and other valuable information for other writers, especially aspiring writers. Here we have an abundance of writing quotes as well as writing process quotes for your benefit. Your art of writing with quotes helps empowers others. Your proper use of the art of empowerment will ensure that your readers return for more upliftment – be it in the form of inspiration, motivation or encouragement.

Writers like authors. poets, editors, and those who write articles, short stories, novels, scripts, make use of all the tools available to them to churn out their material as much as they need. Some of these writers share their hopes and frustrations of their trade in the form interviews and other writings. Most are written in little ‘soundbites’ know as quotes in the written word.

There is immense value in reading other writers’ work. You learn their style and what works for them. Every writer in having something to say, says it quite differently. New writers can learn and develop their own unique style by learning the tricks of the trade.

The important thing is to start writing and develop as one goes along. And read from others who have gone before and have left a trail to follow. So whatever you wish to write about, say it in your own manner of speaking. With your own method, you become different and will be remembered for your ‘style’, or approach. The more you practice your procedure or form, you create a system of your own as a process.

Writing with quotes in your own material can also add a touch of flair or spice up your writing. You can break up the flow of your ‘natural’ writing style by writing quotes, idioms and other sayings. These add substance and texture to what you may otherwise wish to put on paper or your medium of choice. On writing quotes, make sure the quotes are correct and credited accurately. As you weave as much different elements into your writing, you break up the monotony and boring your readers.

“Originality is nothing but judicious imitation. The most original writers borrowed one from another. The instruction we find in books is like fire. We fetch it from our neighbor’s, kindle it at home, communicate it to others, and it becomes the property of all.” Unverified though attributed to Voltaire

“A blank piece of paper is God’s way of telling us how hard it is to be God.” Sidney Sheldon

“A good book isn’t written, it’s rewritten.” Phyllis A. Whitney

“A good novel tells us the truth about its hero; but a bad novel tells us the truth about its author.” G.K. Chesterton

“A good poem is a contribution to reality. The world is never the same once a good poem has been added to it. A good poem helps to change the shape of the universe, helps to extend everyone’s knowledge of himself and the world around him.” Dylan Thomas

“A good writer possesses not only his own spirit but also the spirit of his friends.” Friedrich Nietzsche

“A man really writes for an audience of about ten persons. Of course if others like it, that is clear gain. But if those ten are satisfied, he is content. A certain amount of encouragement is necessary.” Alfred North Whitehead

“A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. He has no master except his own soul, and that, I am sure, is why he does it” Roald Dahl

“A poem begins with a lump in the throat; a homesickness or a love sickness. It is a reaching-out toward expression; an effort to find fulfillment. A complete poem is one where an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.” Robert Frost

“A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.” Richard Bach

“A rule says “You must do it this way”. A principle says, “This works, and has through all remembered time.” The difference is crucial. Your work needn’t be modeled after the well-made play; rather it must be well made within the principles that shape our art. Anxious, inexperienced writers obey rules. Rebellious, unschooled writers break rules. Artists master the form.” Robert McKee

“A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?” George Orwell

George Orwell pen name for Eric Arthur Blair. Attribution: Branch of the National Union of Journalists
George Orwell pen name for Eric Arthur Blair. Attribution: Branch of the National Union of Journalists

“A short story I have written long ago would barge into my house in the middle of the night, shake me awake and shout, ‘Hey, this is no time for sleeping! You can’t forget me, there’s still more to write!’ Impelled by that voice, I would find myself writing a novel. In this sense, too, my short stories and novels connect inside me in a very natural, organic way.” Haruki Murakami

“A short story is a different thing altogether – a short story is like a quick kiss in the dark from a stranger.” Stephen King

“A short story is a love affair, a novel is a marriage. A short story is a photograph; a novel is a film.” Lorrie Moore

“A short story is a sprint, a novel is a marathon. Sprinters have seconds to get from here to there and then they are finished. Marathoners have to carefully pace themselves so that they don’t run out of energy (or in the case of the novelist – ideas) because they have so far to run. To mix the metaphor, writing a short story is like having a short intense affair, whereas writing a novel is like a long rich marriage.” Jonathan Carroll

“A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labours of a spasmodic Hercules.” Anthony Trollope

“A story has no beginning or end: arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead.” Graham Greene

“A story is a magnificent painting that draws you in and captures your attention with words.” Liza M. Wiemer

“A story is not like a road to follow, it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.” Alice Munro

“A well-composed book is a magic carpet on which we are wafted to a world that we cannot enter in any other way.” Caroline Gordon

“A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” Virginia Woolf

“A word after a word after a word is power.” Margaret Atwood

“A writer – and, I believe, generally all persons – must think that whatever happens to him or her is a resource. All things have been given to us for a purpose, and an artist must feel this more intensely. All that happens to us, including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments, all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art.” Jorge Luis Borges

“A writer is a person who cares what words mean, what they say, how they say it. Writers know words are their way towards truth and freedom, and so they use them with care, with thought, with fear, with delight. By using words well they strengthen their souls. Story-tellers and poets spend their lives learning that skill and art of using words well. And their words make the souls of their readers stronger, brighter, deeper.” Ursula K. Le Guin

“A writer is like God. He can destroy empires, create new universes.” Stan Lee

“A writer is someone for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.” Thomas Mann

“A writer only begins a book. A reader finishes it.” Samuel Johnson

“Advice? I don’t have advice. Stop aspiring and start writing. If you’re writing, you’re a writer. Write like you’re a goddamn death row inmate and the governor is out of the country and there’s no chance for a pardon. Write like you’re clinging to the edge of a cliff, white knuckles, on your last breath, and you’ve got just one last thing to say, like you’re a bird flying over us and you can see everything, and please, for God’s sake, tell us something that will save us from ourselves. Take a deep breath and tell us your deepest, darkest secret, so we can wipe our brow and know that we’re not alone. Write like you have a message from the king. Or don’t. Who knows, maybe you’re one of the lucky ones who doesn’t have to.” Alan Wilson Watts

“After being turned down by numerous publishers, he had decided to write for posterity.” George Ade

“After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.” Philip Pullman

“After writing a story I was always empty and both sad and happy, as though I had made love, and I was sure this was a very good story although I would not know truly how good until I read it over the next day.” Ernest Hemingway

“All I need is a sheet of paper and something to write with, and then I can turn the world upside down.” Friedrich Nietzsche

“All that I hope to say in books, all that I ever hope to say, is that I love the world.” E.B. White

“All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.” Ernest Hemingway

“Always be a poet, even in prose.” Charles Baudelaire

“An artist is someone who can hold two opposing viewpoints and still remain fully functional.” F. Scott Fitzgerald

“And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.” Sylvia Plath

“Any writer, I suppose, feels that the world into which he was born is nothing less than a conspiracy against the cultivation of his talent.” James Baldwin

“Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days.” Flannery O’Connor

“Anyone moderately familiar with the rigours of composition will not need to be told the story in detail; how he wrote and it seemed good; read and it seemed vile; corrected and tore up; cut out; put in; was in ecstasy; in despair; had his good nights and bad mornings; snatched at ideas and lost them; saw his book plain before him and it vanished; acted people’s parts as he ate; mouthed them as he walked; now cried; now laughed; vacillated between this style and that; now preferred the heroic and pompous; next the plain and simple; now the vales of Tempe; then the fields of Kent or Cornwall; and could not decide whether he was the divinest genius or the greatest fool in the world.” Virginia Woolf

“Appearance blinds, whereas words reveal.” Oscar Wilde

“Art is the overflow of emotion into action.” Brian Raif

“At night, when the objective world has slunk back into its cavern and left dreamers to their own, there come inspirations and capabilities impossible at any less magical and quiet hour. No one knows whether or not he is a writer unless he has tried writing at night.” H.P. Lovecraft

“At one time I thought the most important thing was talent. I think now that — the young man or the young woman must possess or teach himself, train himself, in infinite patience, which is to try and to try and to try until it comes right. He must train himself in ruthless intolerance. That is, to throw away anything that is false no matter how much he might love that page or that paragraph. The most important thing is insight, that is, curiosity to wonder, to mull, and to muse why it is that man does what he does. And if you have that, then I don’t think the talent makes much difference, whether you’ve got that or not.” William Faulkner

“Being a writer is a very peculiar sort of a job: it’s always you versus a blank sheet of paper (or a blank screen) and quite often the blank piece of paper wins.” Neil Gaiman

“Being a writer that doesn’t read is like being a chef that never tastes anyone else’s food.” Shana Chartier

“Being in the mood to write, like being in the mood to make love, is a luxury that isn’t necessary in a long-term relationship. Just as the first caress can lead to a change of heart, the first sentence, however tentative and awkward, can lead to a desire to go just a little further.” Julia Cameron

“By now, it is probably very late at night, and you have stayed up to read this book when you should have gone to sleep. If this is the case, then I commend you for falling into my trap. It is a writer’s greatest pleasure to hear that someone was kept up until the unholy hours of the morning reading one of his books. It goes back to authors being terrible people who delight in the suffering of others. Plus, we get a kickback from the caffeine industry.” Brandon Sanderson

“Compare: First, have something to say. Second, say it. Third, stop when you have said it. Fourth, give it a good title.” John Shaw Billings

“Constant work, constant writing and constant revision. The real writer learns nothing from life. He is more like an oyster or a sponge. What he takes in he takes in normally the way any person takes in experience. But it is what is done with it in his mind, if he is a real writer, that makes his art.” Gore Vidal

“Cram your head with characters and stories. Abuse your library privileges. Never stop looking at the world, and never stop reading to find out what sense other people have made of it. If people give you a hard time and tell you to get your nose out of a book, tell them you’re working. Tell them it’s research. Tell them to pipe down and leave you alone.” Jennifer Weiner

“Cut out all these exclamation points. An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.” F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Description begins in the writer’s imagination, but should finish in the reader’s.” Stephen King

“Don’t bend; don’t water it down; don’t try to make it logical; don’t edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.” Franz Kafka

“Don’t over edit. Don’t second-guess yourself, or your ideas. Just write. Write every day, and keep at it. Don’t get discouraged with the rejections. Tape them up on your office wall, to remind you of all the hard work you put in when you finally start getting published! It’s all about persistence and passion. And have fun with it. Don’t forget to have fun.” Heather Grace Stewart

“E.L. Doctorow said once said that ‘Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can see only as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.’ You don’t have to see where you’re going, you don’t have to see your destination or everything you will pass along the way. You just have to see two or three feet ahead of you. This is right up there with the best advice on writing, or life, I have ever heard.” Anne Lamott

“Easy reading is damn hard writing.” Nathaniel Hawthorne

“Effective writing isn’t in the mechanics. Anyone can master the mechanical act of stringing together words and sentences and paragraphs to make a character move from A to B. The bookstores are full of evidence. But that’s not writing. Writing isn’t about the words, it’s about the experience. It’s about the feeling that the story creates inside of you. If there’s no feeling, there’s no story.” David Gerrold

“Every writer hopes or boldly assumes that his life is in some sense exemplary, that the particular will turn out to be universal.” Martin Amis

“Every writer is a frustrated actor who recites his lines in the hidden auditorium of his skull.” Rod Serling

“Everybody is talented because everybody who is human has something to express.” Brenda Ueland

“Everyone is born creative; everyone is given a box of crayons in kindergarten. Then when you hit puberty they take the crayons away and replace them with dry, uninspiring books on algebra, history, etc. Being suddenly hit years later with the ‘creative bug’ is just a wee voice telling you, ‘I’d like my crayons back, please.” Hugh MacLeod

“Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.” Flannery O’Connor

“Fantasy is hardly an escape from reality. It’s a way of understanding it.” Lloyd Alexander

“Fiction is art and art is the triumph over chaos, to celebrate a world that lies spread out around us like a bewildering and stupendous dream.” John Cheever

“Fiction is the truth inside the lie.” Stephen King

Stephen King at the Harvard Book Store. Author: bunkosquad / Michael Femia
Stephen King at the Harvard Book Store. Author: bunkosquad / Michael Femia

“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” William Wordsworth

“Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depth of your heart; confess to yourself you would have to die if you were forbidden to write.” Rainer Maria Rilke

“Fine writers should split hairs together, and sit side by side, like friendly apes, to pick the fleas from each other’s fur.” Logan Pearsall Smith

“First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.” Octavia Butler

“For it would seem – her case proved it – that we write, not with the fingers, but with the whole person. The nerve which controls the pen winds itself about every fibre of our being, threads the heart, pierces the liver.” Virginia Woolf

“For most of the process, nothing but faith, fueled by your own stubbornness, will be pulling you along. The work that you’ve done on the book so far won’t be much comfort, because so much of it will be insufferable crap, until the very last moment, when you figure out how to fix it and everything comes together.” Kristin Cashore

“Good fiction writers have an instinctive understanding of human nature. That’s what makes stories and characters captivating. Good spiritual writers share what they sincerely practice themselves.” Donna Goddard

“Good writers indulge their audience; great writers know better.” Tom Heehler

“Have you ever pondered the miracle of popcorn? It starts out as a tiny, little, compact kernel with magic trapped inside that when agitated, bursts to create something marvelously desirable. It’s sort of like those tiny, little thoughts trapped inside an author’s head that―in an excited explosion of words―suddenly become a captivating fairy tale!” Richelle E. Goodrich

“He wins every hand who mingles profit with pleasure, by delighting and instructing the reader at the same time.” Horace

“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” Winston S. Churchill

“How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.” Henry David Thoreau

“Humility is an essential quality in writers who want to write well.” Margaret Jean (Peggy) Langstaff

“I always worked until I had something done and I always stopped when I knew what was going to happen next. That way I could be sure of going on the next day.” Ernest Hemingway

“I am a galley slave to pen and ink.” Honore de Balzac

“I am irritated by my own writing. I am like a violinist whose ear is true, but whose fingers refuse to reproduce precisely the sound he hears within.” Gustave Flaubert

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.” Anne Frank

Anne Frank Inspirational Women In History

“I do not plan my fiction any more than I normally plan woodland walks; I follow the path that seems most promising at any given point, not some itinerary decided before entry.” John Fowles

“I don’t distinguish between magic and art. When I got into magic, I realised I had been doing it all along, ever since I wrote my first pathetic story or poem when I was twelve or whatever. This has all been my magic, my way of dealing with it.” Alan Moore

“I felt that writing for bread would soon have stifled my genius and destroyed my talents, which were more those of the heart than of the pen, and arose solely from a proud and elevated manner of thinking, which alone could support them.” Rousseau

“I hate writing, I love having written.” Dorothy Parker

“I have often believed the pen to be a needle, and ink to be a thread. Each story is an intricately woven tapestry and with each word I invariably sew a piece of myself into the page.” Shaun Hick

“I have written almost all my life. My writing has drawn, out of a reluctant soul, a measure of astonishment at the nature of life. And the more I wrote well, the better I felt I had to write. In writing I had to say what had happened to me, yet present it as though it had been magically revealed. I began to write seriously when I had taught myself the discipline necessary to achieve what I wanted. When I touched that time, my words announced themselves to me. I have given my life to writing without regret, except when I consider what in my work I might have done better. I wanted my writing to be as good as it must be, and on the whole I think it is. I would write a book, or a short story, at least three times — once to understand it, the second time to improve the prose, and a third to compel it to say what it still must say. Somewhere I put it this way: first drafts are for learning what one’s fiction wants him to say. Revision works with that knowledge to enlarge and enhance an idea, to re-form it. Revision is one of the exquisite pleasures of writing: The men and things of today are wont to lie fairer and truer in tomorrow’s meadow, Henry Thoreau said. I don’t regret the years I put into my work. Perhaps I regret the fact that I was not two men, one who could live a full life apart from writing; and one who lived in art, exploring all he had to experience and know how to make his work right; yet not regretting that he had put his life into the art of perfecting the work.” Bernard Malamud

“I hope you will go out and let stories, that is life, happen to you, and that you will work with these stories from your life – not someone else’s life – water them with your blood and tears and your laughter till they bloom, till you yourself burst into bloom. That is the work. The only work.” Clarissa Pinkola Estés

“I love writing. I love the swirl and swing of words as they tangle with human emotions.” James Michener

“I never waited for my Irish Cream coffee to be the right temperature, with a storm happening outside and my fireplace crackling. I wrote every day, at home, in the office, whether I felt like it or not, I just did it.” Stephen J. Cannell

“I read the way a person might swim, to save his or her life. I wrote that way too.” Mary Oliver

“I realized that the purpose of writing is to inflate weak ideas, obscure poor reasoning, and inhibit clarity. With a little practice, writing can be an intimidating and impenetrable fog!” Bill Watterson

“I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they’re going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there’s going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up. The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it. They kind of know what seed it is, they know if planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don’t know how many branches it’s going to have, they find out as it grows. And I’m much more a gardener than an architect.” George R.R. Martin

“I think writing, my writing, is a species of mediumship. I become the person.” Virginia Woolf

“I turned to writing full time in my middle fifties, in part to learn a few of those many things one never has time for in a conventional career. I enjoy trying to write simply, freshly and directly about subjects that specialized experts tend to deal with in jargon.” Herbert Merillat

“I used to be afraid about what people might say or think after reading what I had written. I am not afraid anymore, because when I write, I am not trying to prove anything to anyone, I am just expressing myself and my opinions. It’s ok if my opinions are different from those of the reader, each of us can have his own opinions. So writing is like talking, if you are afraid of writing, you may end up being afraid of talking” Bangambiki Habyarimana

“I was supposed to write a romantic comedy, but my characters broke up.” Ann Brashares

“I would write a book, or a short story, at least three times — once to understand it, the second time to improve the prose, and a third to compel it to say what it still must say.” Bernard Malamud

“I write almost always in the third person, and I don’t think the narrator is male or female anyway. They’re both, and young and old, and wise and silly, and sceptical and credulous, and innocent and experienced, all at once. Narrators are not even human – they’re sprites.” Philip Pullman

“I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear.” Joan Didion

“I write for the same reason I breathe – because if I didn’t, I would die.” Isaac Asimov

“I write not because I want to but because I am destined to.” Jules Haigler

“I write to escape. I haven’t managed it yet, but I’m working on it” William Meikle

“I write to give myself strength. I write to be the characters that I am not. I write to explore all the things I’m afraid of.” Joss Whedon

“I write to record what others erase when I speak, to rewrite the stories others have miswritten about me, about you.” Gloria Anzaldúa

“I write what I would like to read – what I think other women would like to read. If what I write makes a woman in the Canadian mountains cry and she writes and tells me about it, especially if she says ‘I read it to Tom when he came in from work and he cried too,’ I feel I have succeeded.” Kathleen Norris

“I’m a bit of a grinder. Novels are very long, and long novels are very, very long. It’s just a hell of a lot of man-hours. I tend to just go in there, and if it comes, it comes. A morning when I write not a single word doesn’t worry me too much. If I come up against a brick wall, I’ll just go and play snooker or something or sleep on it, and my subconscious will fix it for me. Usually, it’s a journey without maps but a journey with a destination, so I know how it’s going to begin and I know how it’s going to end, but I don’t know how I’m going to get from one to the other. That, really, is the struggle of the novel.” Martin Amis

“I’m not a writer. Ernest Hemingway was a writer. I just have a vivid imagination and type 90 WPM.” Tiffany Madison

“I’m writing. The pages are starting to stack up. My morale is improving the more I feel like a writer.” Neil Gaiman

“I’m a husband, a father of two, a full-time teacher, and so my writing process mostly involves sitting down and writing, any chance I get, anywhere I am, for as long as life will let me. Music helps. Good light helps. I love quiet and coffee when I can get them. But I can write on a bus, in a dentist office’s waiting room, in bed with a clip-on booklight, almost anywhere. And I try to do at least some every single day.” Glen Hirshberg

“I’ve always said, ‘I have nothing to say, only to add.’ And it’s with each addition that the writing gets done. The first draft of anything is really just a track.” Gore Vidal

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.” John Steinbeck

“Ideas aren’t magical; the only tricky part is holding on to one long enough to get it written down.” Lynn Abbey

“If a writer falls in love with you, you can never die.” Mik Everett

“If it was easy, everyone would do it rather than going around telling you their ideas and saying how they could be a writer if they had the time.” Arthur M. Jolly

“If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” Toni Morrison

“If writing didn’t require thinking then we’d all be doing it.” Jeremiah Laabs

“If you can’t annoy somebody, there is little point in writing.” Kingsley Amis

“If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don’t write, because our culture has no use for it.” Anais Nin

“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” Stephen King

“If you have any young friends who aspire to become writers, the second greatest favor you can do them is to present them with copies of The Elements of Style. The first greatest, of course, is to shoot them now, while they’re happy.” Dorothy Parker

“If you steal from one author, it’s plagiarism. If you steal from two, it’s research.” Wilson Mizner

“If you want to be a writer-stop talking about it and sit down and write!” Jackie Collins

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” Stephen King

“If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write.” Martin Luther

“If you want to write, if you want to create, you must be the most sublime fool that God ever turned out and sent rambling. You must write every single day of your life. You must read dreadful dumb books and glorious books, and let them wrestle in beautiful fights inside your head, vulgar one moment, brilliant the next. You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads. I wish you a wrestling match with your Creative Muse that will last a lifetime. I wish craziness and foolishness and madness upon you. May you live with hysteria, and out of it make fine stories — science fiction or otherwise. Which finally means, may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.” Ray Bradbury

“Imagination is like a muscle. I found out that the more I wrote, the bigger it got.” Philip José Farmer

“In a very real way, one writes a story to find out what happens in it. Before it is written it sits in the mind like a piece of overheard gossip or a bit of intriguing tattle. The story process is like taking up such a piece of gossip, hunting down the people actually involved, questioning them, finding out what really occurred, and visiting pertinent locations. As with gossip, you can’t be too surprised if important things turn up that were left out of the first-heard version entirely; or if points initially made much of turn out to have been distorted, or simply not to have happened at all.” Samuel R. Delany

“In every man’s writings, the character of the writer must lie recorded.” Thomas Carlyle

“In many cases when a reader puts a story aside because it ‘got boring’, the boredom arose because the writer grew enchanted with his powers of description and lost sight of his priority, which is to keep the ball rolling.” Stephen King

“In the final exam in the Chaucer course we were asked why he used certain verbal devices, certain adjectives, why he had certain characters behave in certain ways. And I wrote, ‘I don’t think Chaucer had any idea why he did any of these things. That isn’t the way people write.’ I believe this as strongly now as I did then. Most of what is best in writing isn’t done deliberately.” Madeleine L’Engle

“In the mental disturbance and effort of writing, what sustains you is the certainty that on every page there is something left unsaid.” Cesare Pavese

“Indeed, learning to write may be part of learning to read. For all I know, writing comes out of a superior devotion to reading.” Eudora Welty

“It had been startling and disappointing to me to find out that story books had been written by people, that books were not natural wonders, coming up of themselves like grass. Yet regardless of where they come from, I cannot remember a time when I was not in love with them – with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself. Still illiterate, I was ready for them, committed to all the reading I could give them.” Eudora Welty

“It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? for the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone.” Vita Sackville-West

“It took me fifteen years to discover that I had no talent for writing, but I couldn’t give it up because by that time I was too famous.” Robert Benchley

“It’s none of their business that you have to learn how to write. Let them think you were born that way.” Ernest Hemingway

“It’s okay to disagree with the thoughts or opinions expressed by other people. That doesn’t give you the right to deny any sense they might make. Nor does it give you a right to accuse someone of poorly expressing their beliefs just because you don’t like what they are saying. Learn to recognize good writing when you read it, even if it means overcoming your pride and opening your mind beyond what is comfortable.” Ashly Lorenzana

“Just as a good rain clears the air, a good writing day clears the psyche.” Julia Cameron

“Learn as much by writing as by reading.” John Dalberg-Acton

“Let me live, love, and say it well in good sentences.” Sylvia Plath

“Life is writing. The sole purpose of mankind is to engrave the thoughts of divinity onto the tablets of nature.” Friedrich Schlegel

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” Virginia Woolf

“Make it dark, make it grim, make it tough, but then, for the love of God, tell a joke.” Joss Whedon

“Make up a story… For our sake and yours forget your name in the street; tell us what the world has been to you in the dark places and in the light. Don’t tell us what to believe, what to fear. Show us belief’s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul.” Toni Morrison

“Making love to me is amazing. Wait, I meant: making love, to me, is amazing. The absence of two little commas nearly transformed me into a sex god.
” Dark Jar Tin Zoo

“May God give power to every word of mine. In his name I began to write this, and in His name I close it.” Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

“Most writers enjoy two periods of happiness – when a glorious idea comes to mind and, secondly, when a last page has been written and you haven’t had time to know how much better it ought to be.” J. B. Priestley

“Much of writing might be described as mental pregnancy with successive difficult deliveries.” J. B. Priestley

“My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way.” Ernest Hemingway

“My books are water; those of the great geniuses is wine. Everybody drinks water.” Mark Twain

“My bursting heart must find vent at my pen.” Abigail Adams

“My mouth shall be the mouth of those calamities that have no mouth, my voice the freedom of those who break down in the prison holes of despair.” Aimé Césaire

“My task which I am trying to achieve is, by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel — it is, before all, to make you see. That — and no more, and it is everything. If I succeed, you shall find there according to your deserts: encouragement, consolation, fear, charm — all you demand; and, perhaps, also that glimpse of truth for which you have forgotten to ask.” Joseph Conrad

“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” Robert Frost

“Nobody reads a book to get to the middle.” Mickey Spillane

“Not everyone can make a first-rate living as a writer, but a writer who is serious and responsible about his work, and life, will probably find a way to earn a decent living, if he or she writes well.” Bernard Malamud

“Of all those arts in which the wise excel, Nature’s chief masterpiece is writing well.” John Sheffield

“One always has a better book in one’s mind than one can manage to get onto paper.” Michael Cunningham

“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.” Jack Kerouac

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” Arthur Schopenhauer

“People make interesting assumptions about the profession. The writer is a mysterious figure, wandering lonely as a cloud, fired by inspiration, or perhaps a cocktail or two.” Sara Sheridan

“People who think that grammar is just a collection of rules and restrictions are wrong. If you get to like it, grammar reveals the hidden meaning of history, hides disorder and abandonment, links things and brings opposites together. Grammar is a wonderful way of organising the world how you’d like it to be.” Delphine de Vigan

“Perhaps I write for no one. Perhaps for the same person children are writing for when they scrawl their names in the snow.” Margaret Atwood

“Personally I think that grammar is a way to attain beauty.” Muriel Barbery

“Please write again soon. Though my own life is filled with activity, letters encourage momentary escape into others lives and I come back to my own with greater contentment.” Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey

“Read a thousand books, and your words will flow like a river.” Lisa See

“Read, read, read. Read everything – trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.” William Faulkner

“Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.” Francis Bacon

“Rules such as “Write what you know,” and “Show, don’t tell,” while doubtlessly grounded in good sense, can be ignored with impunity by any novelist nimble enough to get away with it. There is, in fact, only one rule in writing fiction: Whatever works, works.” Tom Robbins

“Say all you have to say in the fewest possible words, or your reader will be sure to skip them; and in the plainest possible words or he will certainly misunderstand them.” John Ruskin

“Science fiction is no more written for scientists than ghost stories are written for ghosts.” Brian Aldiss

“Sifting through long forgotten stories of my childhood and writing on a daily basis, I became obsessed with following the threads of my memories, one leading to another. I start pulling on a single, seemingly trivial strand, only to discover it is attached to a longer strand; that one in turn is attached to an even bigger one. Sometimes, I find have tugged a whole, hidden tapestry of my past into view, one thread at a time.” Alice Bag

“So it is that a writer writes many books. In each book, he intended several urgent and vivid points, many of which he sacrificed as the book’s form hardened.” Annie Dillard

“So long as you write what you wish to write, that is all that matters; and whether it matters for ages or only for hours, nobody can say.” Virginia Woolf

“So okay― there you are in your room with the shade down and the door shut and the plug pulled out of the base of the telephone. You’ve blown up your TV and committed yourself to a thousand words a day, come hell or high water. Now comes the big question: What are you going to write about? And the equally big answer: Anything you damn well want.” Stephen King

“So what? All writers are lunatics!” Cornelia Funke

“Some things are hard to write about. After something happens to you, you go to write it down, and either you over dramatize it, or underplay it, exaggerate the wrong parts or ignore the important ones. At any rate, you never write it quite the way you want to.” Sylvia Plath

“Some writers enjoy writing, I am told. Not me. I enjoy having written.” George R.R. Martin

“Sometimes I scare myself at how easily I slip inside my mind and live vicariously through these characters.” Teresa Mummert

“Sometimes writing is running downhill, your fingers jerking behind you on the keyboard the way your legs do when they can’t quite keep up with gravity.” Rainbow Rowell

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” Louis L’Amour

“Stories are the collective wisdom of everyone who has ever lived. Your job as a storyteller is not simply to entertain. Nor is it to be noticed for the way you turn a phrase. You have a very important job – one of the most important. Your job is to let people know that everyone shares their feelings – and that these feelings bind us. Your job is a healing art, and like all healers, you have a responsibility. Let people know they are not alone. You must make people understand that we are all the same.” Brian McDonald

“Stories may well be lies, but they are good lies that say true things, and which can sometimes pay the rent.” Neil Gaiman

“Tears are words that need to be written.” Paulo Coelho

“That so many writers have been prepared to accept a kind of martyrdom is the best tribute that flesh can pay to the living spirit of man as expressed in his literature. One cannot doubt that the martyrdom will continue to be gladly embraced. To some of us, the wresting of beauty out of language is the only thing in the world that matters.” Anthony Burgess

“That’s all we have, finally, the words, and they had better be the right ones.” Raymond Carver

“That’s what fiction is for. It’s for getting at the truth when the truth isn’t sufficient for the truth.” Tim O’Brien

“The best time for planning a book is while you’re doing the dishes.” Agatha Christie

“The bottom line is, I have to write the story I want to write. I never wrote them with a focus group of 8-year-olds in mind. I have to continue telling the story the way I want to tell it. I don’t at all relish the idea of children in tears, and I absolutely don’t deny it’s frightening. But it’s supposed to be frightening! And if you don’t show how scary that is, you cannot show how incredibly brave Harry is.” J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling Inspirational Women In History

“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter. ’tis the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.” Mark Twain

“The effort of expression has a bearing not only on the form but on the thought and on the whole inner being. So long as bare simplicity of expression is not attained, the thought has not touched or even come near to true greatness. The real way of writing is to write as we translate. When we translate a text written in some foreign language, we do not seek to add anything to it; on the contrary, we are scrupulously careful not to add anything to it. That is how we have to try to translate a text which is not written down.” Simone Weil

“The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.” Terry Pratchett

“The first draft of anything is shit.” Ernest Hemingway

“The first person you should think of pleasing, in writing a book, is yourself. If you can amuse yourself for the length of time it takes to write a book, the publishers and the readers can and will follow.” Patricia Highsmith

“The first step – especially for young people with energy and drive and talent, but not money – the first step to controlling your world is to control your culture. To model and demonstrate the kind of world you demand to live in. To write the books. Make the music. Shoot the films. Paint the art.” Chuck Palahniuk

“The first thing you have to learn when you go into the arts is to learn to cope with rejection. If you can’t, you’re dead” Warren Adler

“The free-lance writer is a man who is paid per piece or per word or perhaps.” Robert Benchley

“The hard part about writing a novel is finishing it.” Ernest Hemingway

“The imaginative artist willy-nilly influences his time. If he understands his responsibility and acts on it—taking the art seriously always, himself never quite—he can make a contribution equal to, if different from, that of the scientist, the politician, and the jurist. The anarchic artist so much in vogue now—asserting with vehemence and violence that he writes only for himself, grubbing in the worst seams of life—can do damage. But he can also be so useful in breaking up obsolete molds, exposing shams, and crying out the truth, that the broadest freedom of art seems to me necessary to a country worth living in.” Herman Wouk

“The most important things are the hardest to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them — words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they’re brought out. But it’s more than that, isn’t it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you’ve said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it. That’s the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear.” Stephen King

“The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” Thomas Jefferson

“The need of success might have made me strive to say what might please the multitude, rather than what was true and useful, and instead of a distinguished author which I might possibly become, I should have ended in becoming nothing but a mere scribbler.” Rousseau

“The only ‘ironclad rules’ in writing fiction are the laws of physics and the principles of grammar, and even those can be bent.” Val Kovalin

“The only way you can write the truth is to assume that what you set down will never be read. Not by any other person, and not even by yourself at some later date. Otherwise you begin excusing yourself. You must see the writing as emerging like a long scroll of ink from the index finger of your right hand; you must see your left hand erasing it.” Margaret Atwood

“The original writer is not one who imitates nobody, but one whom nobody can imitate.” François-René de Chateaubriand

“The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” Vladimir Nabokov

“The person who writes for fools is always sure of a large audience.” Arthur Schopenhauer

“The personal essay is vulnerable. It cannot stand upon its footnotes.” Mary L. Bradford

“The present writer writes because for him it is a luxury that becomes all the more enjoyable and conspicuous the fewer who buy and read what he writes.” Søren Kierkegaard

“The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.” Albert Camus

“The reason I got into magic was that it seemed to be what was lying at the end of the path of writing. If I wanted to continue on that path, I was going to have to get into that territory because I had followed writing as far as I thought I could without taking a step over the edges of rationality. The path led out of rational confines. When you start thinking about art and creativity, rationality is not big enough to contain it all.” Alan Moore

“The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself.” Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt Inspirational Women In History

“The role of a writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.” Anais Nin

“The second thing you have to do to be a writer is to keep on writing. Don’t listen to people who tell you that very few people get published and you won’t be one of them. Don’t listen to your friend who says you are better that Tolkien and don’t have to try any more. Keep writing, keep faith in the idea that you have unique stories to tell, and tell them. I meet far too many people who are going to be writers ‘someday.’ When they are out of high school, when they’ve finished college, after the wedding, when the kids are older, after I retire. That is such a trap you will never have any more free time than you do right now. So, whether you are 12 or 70, you should sit down today and start being a writer if that is what you want to do. You might have to write on a notebook while your kids are playing on the swings or write in your car on your coffee break. That’s okay. I think we’ve all ‘been there, done that.’ It all starts with the writing.” Robin Hobb

“The secret of being a bore is to tell everything.” Voltaire

“The story is always better than your ability to write it.” Robin McKinley

“The tendinous part of the mind, so to speak, is more developed in winter; the fleshy, in summer. I should say winter had given the bone and sinew to literature, summer the tissues and the blood.” John Burroughs

“The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words.” William H. Gass

“The world is our classroom. Like the world, every piece of writing is a work in progress.” Amy Corzine

“The writer must believe that what he is doing is the most important thing in the world. And he must hold to this illusion even when he knows it is not true.” John Steinbeck

“There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.” Charles Dickens

“There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.” W. Somerset Maugham

“There comes a time in your life when you have to choose to turn the page, write another book or simply close it.” Shannon L. Alder

“There is creative reading as well as creative writing.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” Maya Angelou

“There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.” Frank Herbert

“There is no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges.” Ernest Hemingway

“There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you.” Beatrix Potter

“There is something way more bigger than just being a writer. Being a writer doesn’t mean you just write about things because you want that. It means that you are capable to feel this world and every emotion deepest than you can, and you’re just sharing that with people all around the world. It means that there is something common between infinity and writing. Writing makes me feel immortal. You just can’t stop, cause there are endless words inside of you.” Tamara Stamenkovic

“There is such a place as fairyland – but only children can find the way to it. And they do not know that it is fairyland until they have grown so old that they forget the way. One bitter day, when they seek it and cannot find it, they realize what they have lost; and that is the tragedy of life. On that day the gates of Eden are shut behind them and the age of gold is over. Henceforth they must dwell in the common light of common day. Only a few, who remain children at heart, can ever find that fair, lost path again; and blessed are they above mortals. They, and only they, can bring us tidings from that dear country where we once sojourned and from which we must evermore be exiles. The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and story-tellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland.” L.M. Montgomery

“There’s no such thing as perfect writing, just like there’s no such thing as perfect despair.” Haruki Murakami

“These two rules make the best system: first, have something to say; second, say it.” Nathanael Emmons

“This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It’s that easy, and that hard.” Neil Gaiman

“This is what love does: It makes you want to rewrite the world. It makes you want to choose the characters, build the scenery, guide the plot. The person you love sits across from you, and you want to do everything in your power to make it possible, endlessly possible. And when it’s just the two of you, alone in a room, you can pretend that this is how it is, this is how it will be.” David Levithan

“This tremendous world I have inside of me. How to free myself, and this world, without tearing myself to pieces. And rather tear myself to a thousand pieces than be buried with this world within me.” Kafka Franz

“Thus, in a real sense, I am constantly writing autobiography, but I have to turn it into fiction in order to give it credibility.” Katherine Paterson

“To write well, express yourself like the common people, but think like a wise man.” Aristotle

“Tomorrow may be hell, but today was a good writing day, and on the good writing days nothing else matters.” Neil Gaiman

“True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, as those move easiest who have learn’d to dance.” Alexander Pope

“We can destroy what we have written, but we cannot unwrite it.” Anthony Burgess

“We live and breathe words. It was books that made me feel that perhaps I was not completely alone. They could be honest with me, and I with them. Reading your words, what you wrote, how you were lonely sometimes and afraid, but always brave; the way you saw the world, its colors and textures and sounds, I felt – I felt the way you thought, hoped, felt, dreamt. I felt I was dreaming and thinking and feeling with you. I dreamed what you dreamed, wanted what you wanted- and then I realized that truly I just wanted you.” Cassandra Clare

“We should not write so that it is possible for [the reader] to understand us, but so that it is impossible for him to misunderstand us.” Quintilian

“We who make stories know that we tell lies for a living. But they are good lies that say true things, and we owe it to our readers to build them as best we can. Because somewhere out there is someone who needs that story. Someone who will grow up with a different landscape, who without that story will be a different person. And who with that story may have hope, or wisdom, or kindness, or comfort. And that is why we write.” Neil Gaiman

“We will need to find people who will provide a safe writing space for us, where criticism comes late and love and delight come early.” L.L. Barkat

“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.” Anais Nin

“What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.” Carl Sagan

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.” J.D. Salinger

“When I think of the good things still to be written I am glad, for there is no end to them, and I know I myself shall write some of them.” William Saroyan

“When I was young I longed to write a great novel that should win me fame. Now that I am getting old my first book is written to amuse children. For aside from my evident inability to do anything “great,” I have learned to regard fame as a will-o-the-wisp which, when caught, is not worth the possession; but to please a child is a sweet and lovely thing that warms one’s heart and brings its own reward.” L. Frank Baum

“When one reads any strongly individual piece of writing, one has the impression of seeing a face somewhere behind the page. It is not necessarily the actual face of the writer.” George Orwell

“When something can be read without effort, great effort has gone into its writing.” Enrique Jardiel Poncela

“When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature.” Ernest Hemingway

“Which of us has not felt that the character we are reading in the printed page is more real than the person standing beside us?” Cornelia Funke

“Why am I compelled to write? Because the writing saves me from this complacency I fear. Because I have no choice. Because I must keep the spirit of my revolt and myself alive. Because the world I create in the writing compensates for what the real world does not give me. By writing I put order in the world, give it a handle so I can grasp it. I write because life does not appease my appetites and hunger. I write to record what others erase when I speak, to rewrite the stories others have miswritten about me, about you.” Gloria Anzaldúa

“Why is it that we understand that playing the cello will require work but we relegate writing to the magic of inspiration?” Ann Patchett

“Why one writes is a question I can answer easily, having so often asked it of myself. I believe one writes because one has to create a world in which one can live. I could not live in any of the worlds offered to me — the world of my parents, the world of war, the world of politics. I had to create a world of my own, like a climate, a country, an atmosphere in which I could breathe, reign, and recreate myself when destroyed by living. That, I believe, is the reason for every work of art.” Anaïs Nin

“With writing, we have second chances.” Jonathan Safran Foer

“Women want love to be a novel. Men, a short story.” Daphne du Maurier

“Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.” Alexander Pope

“Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly – they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” Aldous Huxley

“Words do not express thoughts very well. They always become a little different immediately after they are expressed, a little distorted, a little foolish.” Hermann Hesse

“Work on a good piece of writing proceeds on three levels: a musical one, where it is composed; an architectural one, where it is constructed; and finally, a textile one, where it is woven.” Walter Benjamin

“Write the kind of story you would like to read. People will give you all sorts of advice about writing, but if you are not writing something you like, no one else will like it either.” Meg Cabot

“Write to please themselves or shock themselves or entertain themselves. And if anything, to surprise people in workshop. There’s a linguistic anthropologist named Shirley Brice Heath. Jonathan Franzen has written about her quite a bit. She says the one aspect of writing that people value most is the element of surprise. If a story can surprise the reader, subvert an expectation, then the reader will really treasure that story.” Chuck Palahniuk

“Write what disturbs you, what you fear, what you have not been willing to speak about. Be willing to be split open.” Natalie Goldberg

“Write what should not be forgotten.” Isabel Allende

“Write while the heat is in you. The writer who postpones the recording of his thoughts uses an iron which has cooled to burn a hole with. He cannot inflame the minds of his audience.” Henry David Thoreau

“Write with the door closed, rewrite with the door open.” Stephen King

“Writer’s block is a fancy term made up by whiners so they can have an excuse to drink alcohol.” Steve Martin

“Writers don’t make any money at all. We make about a dollar. It is terrible. But then again we don’t work either. We sit around in our underwear until noon then go downstairs and make coffee, fry some eggs, read the paper, read part of a book, smell the book, wonder if perhaps we ourselves should work on our book, smell the book again, throw the book across the room because we are quite jealous that any other person wrote a book, feel terribly guilty about throwing the schmuck’s book across the room because we secretly wonder if God in heaven noticed our evil jealousy, or worse, our laziness. We then lie across the couch face down and mumble to God to forgive us because we are secretly afraid He is going to dry up all our words because we envied another man’s stupid words. And for this, as I said, we are paid a dollar. We are worth so much more.” Donald Miller

“Writers take words seriously — perhaps the last professional class that does — and they struggle to steer their own through the crosswinds of meddling editors and careless typesetters and obtuse and malevolent reviewers into the lap of the ideal reader.” John Updike

“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” George Orwell

George Orwell pen name for Eric Arthur Blair. Attribution: Branch of the National Union of Journalists
George Orwell pen name for Eric Arthur Blair. Attribution: Branch of the National Union of Journalists

“Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.” Anne Lamott

“Writing became such a process of discovery that I couldn’t wait to get to work in the morning: I wanted to know what I was going to say.” Sharon O’Brien

“Writing is a fine thing, because it combines the two pleasures of talking to yourself and talking to a crowd.” Cesare Pavese

“Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, melancholia, the panic and fear which is inherent in a human situation.” Graham Greene

“Writing is a highly encoded form of communication that takes place from one mind to another.” David Amerland

“Writing is a job, a talent, but it’s also the place to go in your head. It is the imaginary friend you drink your tea with in the afternoon.” Ann Patchett

“Writing is a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.” E.L. Doctorow

“Writing is a struggle against silence.” Carlos Fuentes

“Writing is a way of talking without being interrupted.” Jules Renard

“Writing is nothing less than thought transference, the ability to send one’s ideas out into the world, beyond time and distance, taken at the value of the words, unbound from the speaker.” Arthur M. Jolly

“Writing is something you do alone. Its a profession for introverts who want to tell you a story but don’t want to make eye contact while doing it.” John Green

“Writing is the only thing that when I do it, I don’t feel I should be doing something else.” Gloria Steinem

“Writing is utter solitude, the descent into the cold abyss of oneself.” Franz Kafka

“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it’s about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well. It’s about getting up, getting well, and getting over. Getting happy, okay? Getting happy.” Stephen King

“Writing like this is a little like milking a cow: the milk is so rich and delicious, and the cow is so glad you did it.” Anne Lamott

“Writing simply means no dependent clauses, no dangling things, no flashbacks, and keeping the subject near the predicate. We throw in as many fresh words we can get away with. Simple, short sentences don’t always work. You have to do tricks with pacing, alternate long sentences with short, to keep it vital and alive. Virtually every page is a cliffhanger – you’ve got to force them to turn it.” Dr. Seuss

“You are lucky to be one of those people who wishes to build sand castles with words, who is willing to create a place where your imagination can wander. We build this place with the sand of memories; these castles are our memories and inventiveness made tangible. So part of us believes that when the tide starts coming in, we won’t really have lost anything, because actually only a symbol of it was there in the sand. Another part of us thinks we’ll figure out a way to divert the ocean. This is what separates artists from ordinary people: the belief, deep in our hearts, that if we build our castles well enough, somehow the ocean won’t wash them away. I think this is a wonderful kind of person to be.” Anne Lamott

“You are what you write.” Helvy Tiana Rosa

“You can fix anything but a blank page.” Nora Roberts

“You can make anything by writing.” C.S. Lewis

“You can’t blame a writer for what the characters say.” Truman Capote

“You don’t really understand your thoughts until you express them in words.” Elmer. L Towns

“You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.” Octavia E. Butler

“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.” Madeleine L’Engle

“You know, it’s hard work to write a book. I can’t tell you how many times I really get going on an idea, then my quill breaks. Or I spill ink all over my writing tunic.” Ellen DeGeneres

“You might not write well every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page.” Jodi Picoult

“You must keep sending work out; you must never let a manuscript do nothing but eat its head off in a drawer. You send that work out again and again, while you’re working on another one. If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success – but only if you persist.” Isaac Asimov

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.” Ray Bradbury

“You must write every single day of your life. You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads, may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.” Ray Bradbury

“You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write.” Saul Bellow

“You should write because you love the shape of stories and sentences and the creation of different words on a page. Writing comes from reading, and reading is the finest teacher of how to write.” Annie Proulx

“Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.” Ray Bradbury

“Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write.

This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple “I must,” then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your whole life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse. Then come close to Nature. Then, as if no one had ever tried before, try to say what you see and feel and love and lose.

Describe your sorrows and desires, the thoughts that pass through your mind and your belief in some kind of beauty – describe all these with heartfelt, silent, humble sincerity and, when you express yourself, use the Things around you, the images from your dreams, and the objects that you remember. If your everyday life seems poor, don’t blame it; blame yourself; admit to yourself that you are not enough of a poet to call forth its riches; because for the creator there is not poverty and no poor, indifferent place. And even if you found yourself in some prison, whose walls let in none of the world’s sounds – wouldn’t you still have your childhood, that jewel beyond all price, that treasure house of memories? Turn your attentions to it. Try to raise up the sunken feelings of this enormous past; your personality will grow stronger, your solitude will expand and become a place where you can live in the twilight, where the noise of other people passes by, far in the distance. – And if out of this turning-within, out of this immersion in your own world, poems come, then you will not think of asking anyone whether they are good or not. Nor will you try to interest magazines in these works: for you will see them as your dear natural possession, a piece of your life, a voice from it. A work of art is good if it has arisen out of necessity. That is the only way one can judge it.”

Rainer Maria Rilke